Interesting science stuff from the flying physicist.
Twitter: @rosswizz

18th April 2014

Link reblogged from Recycled Electrons with 1 note

Greasing The Wheels →

recycledelectrons:

image

Chris and Rob Grant talk about plate tectonics, museums and superfluids.

[MP3 Link]

Episode #102. If you have anything you’d like us to look at, or any questions you’d like us to answer - use the links at the top of the web page at http://recycledelec.com. Follow us on Twitter…

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11th April 2014

Photo reblogged from All The Small Quarks with 104 notes

astrodidact:

Since the spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gigantic particle accelerator outside Geneva, have suffered a bit of a drought when it comes to finding new particles. In a welcome relief, the LHCb collaboration, who run one of four large experiments at the LHC, have announced one of the most genuinely exciting observations to come out of the 27km super-collider so far – an exotic particle that cannot be explained by current theories.
In the early 1930s physicists had a clean picture of the subatomic particles that make up our world. Every known atom has a tiny nucleus at its heart surrounded by a cloud of electrons, and each nucleus was made out of varying numbers of protons and neutrons. However, as the decades wore on a number of new, and somewhat unwelcome, particles were discovered, at first in detectors studying particles from outer space and later in particle-collider experiments. By the 1950s, dozens of apparently elementary particles had been discovered, causing frustration among physicists who often brandish an inability to memorise a list of facts as a badge of honour.
The famous physicist Enrico Fermi perhaps best expressed the mood of his colleagues in an infamous remark: “Young man, if I could remember the names of these particles, I would have been a botanist.” Help came in the 1950s when physicists came up with a new model that explained most of these particles as being made up of a small number of truly elementary particles. Borrowing a line from James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake (a book that is even harder to understand than quantum field theory), Murray Gell-Mann dubbed these new particles “quarks”.
By the late 1960s the existence of quarks had been verified experimentally. We now know that there are six in total – the up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top quarks, along with six antiquarks (their anti-matter copies). The quark model neatly explained all these peculiar particles. Protons, neutrons and many others besides are made of three quarks, belonging to a family known as baryons. Alternatively, a quark and an antiquark can pair up to form a meson.
Since then the quark model has been extremely successful, and is now a cornerstone of our understanding of particle physics. It was only at the turn of the millennium that some strange results started to suggest that the model might be incomplete. Until 2003 quarks had only been seen in twos or threes, but then a number of particles that looked like combinations of four quarks started to reveal themselves.
Read more:
http://m.phys.org/news/2014-04-quirky-quark-combination-exotic-particle.html#jCp
http://www.geek.com/science/lhc-proves-another-new-particle-the-exotic-hadron-1590753/

astrodidact:

Since the spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gigantic particle accelerator outside Geneva, have suffered a bit of a drought when it comes to finding new particles. In a welcome relief, the LHCb collaboration, who run one of four large experiments at the LHC, have announced one of the most genuinely exciting observations to come out of the 27km super-collider so far – an exotic particle that cannot be explained by current theories.

In the early 1930s physicists had a clean picture of the subatomic particles that make up our world. Every known atom has a tiny nucleus at its heart surrounded by a cloud of electrons, and each nucleus was made out of varying numbers of protons and neutrons. However, as the decades wore on a number of new, and somewhat unwelcome, particles were discovered, at first in detectors studying particles from outer space and later in particle-collider experiments. By the 1950s, dozens of apparently elementary particles had been discovered, causing frustration among physicists who often brandish an inability to memorise a list of facts as a badge of honour.

The famous physicist Enrico Fermi perhaps best expressed the mood of his colleagues in an infamous remark: “Young man, if I could remember the names of these particles, I would have been a botanist.” Help came in the 1950s when physicists came up with a new model that explained most of these particles as being made up of a small number of truly elementary particles. Borrowing a line from James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake (a book that is even harder to understand than quantum field theory), Murray Gell-Mann dubbed these new particles “quarks”.

By the late 1960s the existence of quarks had been verified experimentally. We now know that there are six in total – the up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top quarks, along with six antiquarks (their anti-matter copies). The quark model neatly explained all these peculiar particles. Protons, neutrons and many others besides are made of three quarks, belonging to a family known as baryons. Alternatively, a quark and an antiquark can pair up to form a meson.

Since then the quark model has been extremely successful, and is now a cornerstone of our understanding of particle physics. It was only at the turn of the millennium that some strange results started to suggest that the model might be incomplete. Until 2003 quarks had only been seen in twos or threes, but then a number of particles that looked like combinations of four quarks started to reveal themselves.

Read more:

http://m.phys.org/news/2014-04-quirky-quark-combination-exotic-particle.html#jCp

http://www.geek.com/science/lhc-proves-another-new-particle-the-exotic-hadron-1590753/

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Source: astrodidact

11th April 2014

Link reblogged from Recycled Electrons with 1 note

Once Every 778 Days →

recycledelectrons:

Chris and Rob talk about Enceladus, falling meteorites, dark matter, and books made from human flesh. The Universe is still expanding and the Daily Express has the worst space article ever - maybe.

[MP3 Link]

Episode #101. If you have anything you’d like us to look at, or any questions…

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29th January 2014

Link

CMS Experiment - Google+ - CMS presents evidence for Higgs decays to fermions! At a… →

google.com

I’d have to go through a lot of physics to understand. I have a very basic understanding of particles.

For example… I didn’t even know the word “leptons”. I had heard of neutrinos, muons and hadrons, …

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29th January 2014

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Tagged: science astronomy nebula

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28th January 2014

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Tagged: science astronomy nebula

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28th January 2014

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Tagged: science astronomy nebula

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27th January 2014

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Tagged: science astronomy nebula

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27th January 2014

Photo with 1 note

Tagged: science astronomy nebula

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26th January 2014

Photo with 1 note

Tagged: science astronomy nebula

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